Catlettsburg, Ky.,
15
July
2014
|
03:06 PM
Europe/Amsterdam

Catlettsburg Refinery Employees in a Repair Affair

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Summary

Marathon Petroleum Corporation (MPC) employees in the Catlettsburg, Ky., area recently took part in a longstanding tradition aimed at giving some neighbors a helping hand – the 14th Annual City of Ashland Repair Affair.

Marathon Petroleum Corporation (MPC) employees in the Catlettsburg, Ky., area recently took part in a longstanding tradition aimed at giving some neighbors a helping hand – the 14th Annual City of Ashland Repair Affair.

“The Repair Affair brings together volunteers from throughout the community to perform household repairs and yard work for people who, for one reason or another, cannot do the work for themselves,” notes Sheila Fraley, community relations representative at MPC’s Catlettsburg refinery. “It provides an opportunity to demonstrate community commitment, help neighbors in need and to enjoy some camaraderie with fellow employees outside the workplace.”

Held in May, more than 60 MPC volunteers, the largest employee group among the total 200 community volunteers, divided into nine teams and began work on 10 houses – eight more than last year. Projects included cleaning out gutters, trimming shrubs, clearing brush and weeds, painting and repairing a variety of items and re-graveling a driveway.

Ordinarily, a team will take about four hours to complete its assigned tasks, but that was not the case this year, according to Nicci Triche, Catlettsburg refinery lab supervisor and project coordinator. “One house on Montgomery Avenue was under a violation notice from the city,” explains Triche, who has organized the company’s Repair Affair activities for the past four years. “It was in very bad repair, needing extensive work on the soffit and gutters, plus the entire house needed painting.”

At a loss as to how one team could possibly complete the tasks in a day’s time, Triche came up with a plan. “As other teams completed their assignments, they were asked to help out at the Montgomery Avenue location, too,” she notes. “By the end of the day, more than two dozen MPC volunteers were working on the Montgomery house alone.”

“Once the house was finished, we planted flowers and spread some mulch,” adds Kenova, W.Va., Terminal Manager Steve Hester, who captained the team. “The elderly lady who owned the house was tickled. She thanked us again and again, wanting to treat us to lunch. Everybody enjoyed it and looks forward to taking part next year.”

“I’m proud to work for a company that encourages community involvement and with employees who are willing to volunteer,” Triche adds. “The homeowners are so appreciative, and it feels good to know you’ve improved quality of life for those who can’t do the work on their own.”